Korean Pretrial Detention: Korean Criminal Law Basics

Korea allows a prosecutor, via approval by a court, the right to hold a defendant pending trial in a criminal case for up to 180 days.  The approval by the Court is the granting of a Pretrial Detention Warrant, also, often referred to, in English, as Korean Arrest Warrant.  In most cases, a decision, in a criminal case, must be rendered within 180 days of the time of the detention or the Defendant must be released from detention prior to the rendering of the judgment by the court.  While bail is possible, in Korea, bail is not typically granted.  In the

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Korean Adoption Law Protests at Olympics in Korea

A good broadcast on issues with Korea’s Adoption Law may be found at: Channel 11 News.  We, regrettably, have handled litigation against the Korean government on issues related to adoption law.  Because of changes to Korea’s adoption law it is much more difficult to adopt children from Korea.  The number of abandoned children is on the rise and it doesn’t seem like Korean families shall pick up the slack anytime soon. The broadcast notes, in part, that: “Abandoned at a fire station in Seoul, South Korea, Dr. Eckerle says she is thankful that her adoptive family in Minnesota found her

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Does a Korean court have the power to issue a preliminary attachment on Korean assets stemming from a foreign court claim?

A situation often arises when a plaintiff is suing a Korean debtor in a foreign court and the non-Korean plaintiff wishes to attach the Korean-based assets of the Korean defendant in Korea.  Typically, the plaintiff found no assets of the defendant abroad and fears the disposal of the assets in Korea.  Thus, typically, the plaintiff wishes to file to a Korean court a request for a provisional attachment of the assets of the prospective defendant.  While, provisional attachments of assets of Korean defendants in lawsuits pending in Korea courts is common – this situation is not common and few courts, or Korean

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Lesson I: Korean Legal Terms & Phrases

This is a first in a serious of posts I shall make for those wanting to learn a little about Korean legal terms. I shall try to post a lesson every week.   I shall try to make this simple at first.  This may be a useful tool, also, for those that are just learning Korean, since I added a few simple sentence.  If you can’t read Korean characters – learn.  The alphabet is easy to learn and I promise that you shall never be able to pronounce words without learning the Korean alphabet. Lesson I: Korean for Korean Law I. Korean

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Expiration Versus Termination of a Distribution Agreement in Korea: Korean Distributor Basics

While Korean Law does not specifically detail the differences in treatment in law between the non-renewal (expiration) of a distribution agreement versus the termination, in reality, Korean courts are less likely to rule in favor of distributors in cases where a distribution agreement is not renewed.  Thus, typically, it is advisable to have a distribution agreement based on a specified term of years.  However, even with the expiration of the Korean Distribution Agreement, termination risks exist. In some cases, Korean courts have noted that termination and even non-renewal is a violation of Korean Law since the non-renewal or termination of

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Law Review Article on Korean Legal Education

I stumbled upon a good law review article on issues with Korean legal education.  The article can be found at: Legal Education in Korea. The abstract for the article is found below.  Worth a read. Korean legal education has been functioning differently from the American legal education system. Comparing it with the American legal education system, this article investigates the meanings of Korean legal education and its aspirational goals under Article 2 of the Law School Act, attempts to identify and analyze the current issues of Korean legal education, and makes recommendations to the Korean legal education reformers to help

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Future of Bitcoin in Korea according to FTC: Korean Cryptocurrency Updates

The head of the Korean Fair Trade Commission has noted to local vernaculars that he does not agree with Justice Minister Park Sang-ki’s comment that “cryptocurrency investment is gambling.”  He further noted that: “cryptocurrency recently emerged as an issue in Korea and other laws do not have the exact legal clauses that relate to closing exchanges.”  Thus, indicating, in part, that the Korean government doesn’t have the specific power to close the Korean cryptocurrency exchanges.  Of course, the FTC Chairman’s opinion does not have any legal binding effect, however, his opinions are widely respected by academics and legal practitioners. Many

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Is Bitcoin Banned for Foreigners in Korea? Korean Bitcoin Law Updates

This Law Firm has wrote a few articles on Bitcoin Law in Korea.  This Alt Currency/Bitcoin Law articles may be found at: Court Challenges to Governments Ban on Cryptocurrency in Korea and Will the Korean Government Ban Bitcoin? Other article can be found via searching the Blog.  A Forbes article notes, with one significant caveat, that: “All foreigners, including residents, nonresidents and “kyopo” ethnic Koreans with foreign citizenship, will be banned from trading cryptocurrencies in Korea, the FSC’s foreign media department said by email. Minors are banned after Prime Minister Lee Nak-yeon earlier claim the cryptocurrency craze could lead the youth toward crime.”

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Infertility/Subfertility & Childcare Leave Law in Korea

The recent Moon Administration is making drastic changes to Korea’s Employment & Labor Law.  A prior article on promises made by the Moon Administration was posted earlier in the year.  Two interesting changes relate to “Subfertility Leave” and “Childcare Leave.”  We shall be updating the reader over the next couple weeks on numerous other issues that are important for employers and employees to understand about Korean Employment & Labor Law.  Check back often and subscribe via the link to Right.   Fertility Leave Law in Korea Employees facing fertility issues may receive three days off per year with one of these

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Non-Compete Restrictive Covenant in Employment Contracts in Korea

Korean courts have invalidated numerous, non-compete agreements, reduced the amount of time of the non-compete period and/or have reduced liquidated damage amounts for violation of non-compete agreements.  Courts typically balance the freedom to work (an ability to work outside the specific field) with the significance of the interest in the employer to enforce the covenant not to compete.  The primary factors courts utilize in determining whether to enforce a non-compete agreement are: if compensation was paid in exchange for the covenant not to compete; if the interest being sought protection over includes valuable trade secrets and other valuable intellectual property;

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Legality of an Employer Lockout in Korea: Korean Labor & Employment Law Basics

Korea, in the eyes of many domestic and foreign companies, has been lax in the enforcement of the rights of employers to run a business.  One noted cases that lead to a decision by the Supreme Court of Korea comes to mind.  Because of a labor strike at a major automobile parts manufacturer and the physical blocking of the use of replacement workers and employer machinery by the employees, the employer implemented a partial unpaid lockout of certain employees (employees were employed by a unit of the employer), thus disallowing certain workers to enter the workplace in order to prevent

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Definition of “Ordinary Wage” in Korea: Korean Employment & Labor Law Basics

The Korean courts, for years, have struggled to find a consistent interpretation of an “Ordinary Wage.”  The definition of Ordinary Wage was clarified by the Korean Supreme Court in two decisions handed down on December 18, 2013.  The calculation of Ordinary Wages is important, since it is utilized to calculate statutory entitlements, and thus has an impact on the aggregate amount of contributions necessary to be paid to an employee.  For example, according to Article 56 of the Korean Labor Standards Act, an employer must pay 50% of the Ordinary Wage plus the Ordinary Wage for overtime, night and weekend

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IPG’s Korean Employment & Labour Law Chapter in Global Legal Insights 2018

IPG is proud to announce the contribution of the Korean chapter to GLI’s 2018 Edition of Employment & Labour Law.  The publication contains chapters from 29 different countries.  The publication may be found at: Employment & Labor Law, Sixth Edition. Key Issues addressed are, among others,: -General Labour Market Conditions in Korea -Employment Policies under the Moon Administration -Litigation Trends in Korea -Definition of “Ordinary Wage” in Korea -Korean Supreme Court’s Regular Interval Bonus Case -Director as an Employee for Korean Employment Security Purposes -Korean Employee Lockouts -Layoffs and Dismissals Based on Fault of the Employees in Korea -Korean Restrictive

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Part-time Worker Annual Paid Leave Obligations under the Korean Labor Standards Act

Employers, in Korea, are in most cases required to grant annual paid leave to full-time and even part-time workers working in Korea-based companies.  Exceptions to this Korean annual paid leave law exist for Korean workers that work, on average, less than 15 hours per week for these Korean-based companies. Article 18 of the Korean Labor Standards Act notes that: “(1) The terms and conditions of employment of part-time workers shall be determined on the basis of relative ration computed in comparison to those work hours of full-time workers engaged in the same kind of work at the pertinent workplace.” However,

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Korean Cryptocurrency Case Filed to the Korean Constitutional Court: Korean Bitcoin Updates

The author of this blog, formerly worked for the Constitutional Court of Korea and he is excited to see this matter being litigated in Korean courts.  The issue, as I have always noted, is simply if government are willing to protect the freedom of individuals to trade and speculate in asset classes of the choosing of the investor.  While, I am far from sold on Bitcoin (and other Alt Currencies) as a long-term asset class plays – of course any free democracy shall allow its citizens to invest in asset classes the government doesn’t favor.  The key to this issue,

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Korean National Tax Service Tax Law News Release to Foreign Corporate Taxpayers: Korean Tax Law Updates

The following Korean Tax Law News is a publicly released Korean tax notification that is intended for foreigner companies in Korea.  The notification was not translated or drafted by this law firm.  For any questions on this notification please Contact Us. Korean Tax Law News 【January 2018】 ☞ The following Korean tax information is translated from Korean for foreign-invested companies, and is not legally binding. ※ Year-end tax settlement by foreign workers in Korea □ With the increase in foreigners residing in Korea, the number of foreign workers in Korea has increased every year as well. ○ For the convenience

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Korean Tax Law Amendment Press Release by Korean Government

The following is a Press Release by the Korean Government on recent Korean Tax Law enforcement decrees.  We shall update the reader when more is known.  The following press release was not proofread or translated by this firm.  The Press Release was published by the Ministry of Strategy & Finance in the English language and copied, in its entirety, below. Decree Focuses on Boosting Investment and Broadening Tax Base The government announced a revision to a total of 17 tax enforcement decrees, including ones to help create jobs, improve income and broaden the tax base.  Major revisions to the 2017

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EEOC Complaints in Korea at Yongsan Army Garrison, Camp Humpreys and Area I: EEO Korea Complaints

This law firm’s U.S. lawyers handle EEOC Korean complaints from our office in Korea; Merit System Protection Board (MSPB) appeals from Korea; grievances under the Negotiated Grievance Procedure from Korea; complaints to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC); lawsuits in U.S. federal court for federal employees working at Yongsan, Camp Humphreys, Area I and throughout the Korean peninsula.  We, also, on occasion handle matters stateside and throughout other parts of Asia.  These matters are all personally handled by Sean Hayes and his team. Some of the employment law work, in these matters, are essential to be performed in Korea when actions

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Apple Sued in Korea for Battery Gate

A local newspaper has reported, today, that 150 plaintiffs have sued Apple for not reporting that the Company slowed down the speed of old phones.  Apple claims it slowed down the phones in order to increase battery.  Similar suits have been filed in the West.  We, likely, will not hear an outcome to this matter until the 4th Quarter of 2018. The articles notes: The main point of contention in the lawsuit, which has gathered 150 plaintiffs, will be whether Apple’s lack of disclosure was intended to push consumers to upgrade to a newer model of the iPhone. The iPhone

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Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Attorney in Korea for U.S. Military Employees

Yes. Some U.S. lawyers in Korea are experienced handling appeals to the Merit System Protection Board (MSPB), grievance under the Negotiated Grievance Procedure and complaints to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Regrettably, only a small group of lawyers in Korea are experienced in U.S. government employment matters for government workers working for the Department of Defense in Korea. Most U.S. lawyers would, only, know where Yongsan is and wouldn’t know Camp Red Cloud from Camp Humphreys. A great deal of the employment law work, in these matters, are necessary to be performed in Korea when actions of the U.S.

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