Korean Adoption Law Protests at Olympics in Korea

A good broadcast on issues with Korea’s Adoption Law may be found at: Channel 11 News.  We, regrettably, have handled litigation against the Korean government on issues related to adoption law.  Because of changes to Korea’s adoption law it is much more difficult to adopt children from Korea.  The number of abandoned children is on the rise and it doesn’t seem like Korean families shall pick up the slack anytime soon. The broadcast notes, in part, that: “Abandoned at a fire station in Seoul, South Korea, Dr. Eckerle says she is thankful that her adoptive family in Minnesota found her

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English-speaking Korean lawyers and International Lawyers at International Law Firm in Korea discussing issues of Korean Law

IPG Legal is a leading client-focused international law firm with offices in Korea that is, often, selected over the ubiquitous Korean Law Firms when success is essential and success depends on nuanced street-smart advice, proactive  and unconflicted representation. Our attorneys are, intentionally. different from the crowd.  From our retired judge partners to our junior associates, we are all trained with an intense focus on client success, lawyer proactivity, and to understand the nexus between your commercial and legal needs. Our attorneys shall never push to you useless memos, non-nuanced legal advice or get you into litigation without an honest assessment of

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Sean Hayes to give Speech at American Bar Association Conference in LA

Sean Hayes will give a presentation entitled Mickey Mouse, Sports Stars, Celebrities, Billions of Dollars at Stake. Who Owns the Rights to an Individual’s or a Character’s Image? 10:30 – 12:30 April 11, 2014. The speech is part of the ABA Business Law Spring Meeting in LA.  More information can be found at: ABA ___info@ipglegal.com (c) Sean Hayes – SJ IPG. All Rights reserved.  Do not duplicate any content on this blog without the express written permission of the author. info@ipglegal.com.

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Hague Child Abduction Convention Acceded to by South Korea

The Republic of Korea in December of 2012 acceded to the Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Abduction.  The Convention enters into force, in Korea, on March 1, 2013.  The Convention was first concluded in 1980.  Korea became the 89th signatory to the Convention. Under this Child Abduction Convention a non-Korean spouse of one of the contracting states may file with the Ministry of Justice of Korea for assistance in the return of a child that was taken into Korea illegally (“abduction”). The case, after filing with the Ministry of Justice, will be under the sole jurisdiction of the

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Sean Hayes in the Christian Science Monitor on Korean Adoptions

I was quoted in today’s issue of the Christian Science Monitor in an adoption law matter that we are assisting on, in a drastically reduced cost capacity, as part of what we believe are our pro bono obligations to Korean society. I fear that this adoption law case may reach all the way to the Korean Constitutional and Supreme courts. The case, I believe, is caused, simply, by misplaced nationalism.  I, also, hope for Korea to be able to adopt most of its children locally, but the reality is that the nation is still not at the stage where this is

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Blind Stubbornness of Ministry of Health and Welfare

Korea’s new adoption law and the interpretation of the law by some in Korea’s Ministry of Health and Welfare (MHW) is contributing to destroying the lives of Korean children in need of loving families. The law, an inter-country adoption quota and, also, the interpretation of the law by the MHW, in short, is making it more difficult for foreigners to adopt Korean children, while placing seemingly more power into the hands of the MHW, an agency that is showing that it cannot be trusted with the increased power. At present the MHW is engaged in the persecution of a birth

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Korea’s Nationalistic Adoption Quota May be Increased

Korea has one of the highest populations of orphans in the OECD because of an unwillingness, in large numbers, of the local Korean population to adopt non-blood related children and a new policy that limits the number of overseas adoptions. The majority of local adoptions are the adoption of the children of family members. The good news is the government may be changing its policy because of its plan to join the Convention on the Protection of Children and Cooperation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention) and realization that its present policy is harming the psychological health of

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