Establishing Business with Korea via an Agent: Korean Agency Law Basics

For some companies wishing to establish business with Korea, the use of a commercial agency relationship may be an ideal way to establish your business presence in Korea. However, this type of agreement comes with risk. Please see: Termination of an Agency Agreement in Korea. https://www.thekoreanlawblog.com/2020/08/distribution-agreement-termination-korea-law.html An agent relationship is often ideal when a company seeks to sell its products in Korea, but wishes to first evaluate and familiarize itself with the Korean market prior to establishing a distributorship relationship

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Korean Independent Contractor Risks: Korean Labor Standards Act Basics

The Korean Court System has been less reluctant, in recent years, to deem a Korean independent contractor an “employee” under the Korean Labor Standards Act (LSA). This fact remains true even when an employer in Korea establishes that the independent contractor is aware that he/she was contracted as an independent contractor and, thus, not a regular employee of the Korean company. Upon the establishment of the status as “employee” in Korea, the individual is entitled to all of the benefits

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Top 100 Korean Lawyers & Legal Consultants in Korea

Sean Hayes, head of the Top Korean Dispute Resolution Law Firm of the Year was rated by LawAsia, one of the leading peer-reviewed publications in Asia, as a Top 100 Lawyer in Korea. Sean Hayes is one of the only non-Korean attorneys on this Korean Lawyer “A-list” and the only non-Korean that was on the list each year the list was published. Sean Hayes is the first non-Korean attorney to have worked for the Korean court system (Constitutional Court of

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Korean Exit Bans for Not Paying Taxes, Custom Duties and Violations of Korean Law

The Korean Immigration Control Act and related acts allow the potential to permanently impose an exit ban from Korea on foreigners for nearly all acts that are determined by the Korean Ministry of Justice as “harming the interest, public safety or order in the economy of the Republic of Korea” until the reason for the exit ban ceases to exist. (Immigration Control Act of Korea Article 4(1)5.) However, IPG Legal has successfully challenged these exit bans in Korea and is

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Exercising Korean Stock Options in Companies in Korea under the Korean Commercial Code

Stock options, in Korea, are often provided to senior foreign and domestic employees of companies in Korea. For stock options, in non-listed/non-public companies in Korea, to be exercisable by employees in Korea (thus a valid option) the option must be approved, in most cases, at a general shareholders meeting of the Korean company. Another article that may be of interest can be found at: Granting & Exercising Stock Options in Korea.   The articles of incorporation of the Korean stock granting

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Minimum Capital Requirements for Setting Up a Corporation in Korea

My friend at the Korean Tax Blog has an excellent post on the minimum capital requirement for setting up a company in Korea. The post notes that: Before 2009, Korean law required a minimum capital of 50 million KRW to estabish a corporation. However, since February 2009, there are no longer any restrictions related to mimimum capital in Korean Law. www.thekoreantaxblog.com This amendment to Korean Law has made it easier to open a company in Korea. However, to open a

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Liability of Persons who have Lent their Names for Korean Business Transactions

In Korea, the person who is actually the subject of rights and obligations, often differs from the nominee such as the holder of licenses or business registrations. Sometimes those with assets use these nominee/proxies to attempt to avoid liability. As such, under certain conditions, a counterparty to a transaction is protected, under the Korean Commercial Act, by acknowledging the liability of not only the party to the transaction, the name borrower, but also the nominee (name lender). See: Korea’s Real Name Transaction

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Valid and Enforceable Contracts in Korea: Korean Contract Law Basics

In Korea, contracts are agreements that are legally binding and enforceable under the law. They can be created for a wide range of purposes, such as employment, real estate, intellectual property, and commercial transactions. A contract, in Korea, is an agreement between two or more parties to create, modify, or terminate obligations that are legally enforceable. To constitute a legally enforceable contract in Korea, there must be: It is important to highlight that certain contracts in Korea require specific formalities

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Dual-Class Shareholdings in Korea: Korean Corporate Law Updates

Prior to the recent amendment to the Special Measures for the Promotion of Venture Businesses Act, Korea was an outlier in the developed world with regard to Dual-Class Shareholdings. Most developed economies allow Dual- Class Shares for IPOs and for unlisted countries. Korea prohibited Dual-Class Shareholding for both listed and unlisted companies. Korean Commercial Code Art. 369(1) The Korean Commercial Code mandates that a shareholder may, only, receive one vote for each share. This so called “One-Share One-Vote Principle” was

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Occupational Safety in Korea: Serious Accidents Punishment Act

The Serious Accident Punishment Act (“SAPA”) was passed by the Korean National Assembly and came into effect on January 27, 2022. With the implementation and recent expansion of the SAPA, we encourage all employers to do a comprehensive compliance audit. Some law firms, including this one, have attorneys and staff that can assist your team in doing a comprehensive audit. SAPA has greatly expanded the list of accidents that are applicable and significantly increased the penalties for breaking the law.

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