Korean Pretrial Detention: Korean Criminal Law Basics

Korea allows a prosecutor, via approval by a court, the right to hold a defendant pending trial in a criminal case for up to 180 days.  The approval by the Court is the granting of a Pretrial Detention Warrant, also, often referred to, in English, as Korean Arrest Warrant.  In most cases, a decision, in a criminal case, must be rendered within 180 days of the time of the detention or the Defendant must be released from detention prior to the rendering of the judgment by the court.  While bail is possible, in Korea, bail is not typically granted.  In the

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Fleeing Korea while under Police/Prosecutor Investigation: International Hold in Korea

From changes a couple of years ago in the computer system and policy of the Korean Immigration Services, even if the Korean prosecution/police have not requested that an accused be placed on an International Hold, some records of police investigations, indictments and proposed fines and sentences by the prosecution/police are being reported to the Korean Immigration Service at airports and ports of departure. An International Hold, in Korea, is an official procedure that flags passports and fingerprints & prevents one, under this International Hold, from departing Korea prior to the lifting of the International Hold. Even if you are not

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Preparation for Korean Police & Prosecutor Interrogations & Witness/Defendant Questioning at Korean Courts

All good Korean attorneys prepare all clients for witness questioning & suspect interrogations in Korea.  Clients may be subpoenaed to appear in a Korean police office, Korean prosecutors office or to appear as a witness or a criminal defendant in a Korean Court and should be thoroughly prepared by their attorneys. We at IPG, hear of too many issues of lawyers, only, telling clients to “tell the truth and don’t worry.”  This is, obviously, not adequate witness or suspect preparation.  We see this from Korean law firms large and small.  Thus, the following list was prepared as a basic guide to necessaries prior

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English-speaking Korean lawyers and International Lawyers at International Law Firm in Korea discussing issues of Korean Law

IPG Legal is a leading client-focused international law firm with offices in Korea that is, often, selected over the ubiquitous Korean Law Firms when success is essential and success depends on nuanced street-smart advice, proactive  and unconflicted representation. Our attorneys are, intentionally. different from the crowd.  From our retired judge partners to our junior associates, we are all trained with an intense focus on client success, lawyer proactivity, and to understand the nexus between your commercial and legal needs. Our attorneys shall never push to you useless memos, non-nuanced legal advice or get you into litigation without an honest assessment of

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English-Speaking Criminal Defense Lawyers in Korea: Defense Lawyers to Hire and Not to Hire?

In all cases, in Korea, where you are accused of a crime and you fear that you may be sentenced to time in jail, may be deported or the conviction may harm your future, hire, quickly, an experienced and proactive English-Fluent Korean criminal defense lawyers prior to any interrogations by the Korean police or prosecution. Sadly, few lawyers, in Korea, are useful for criminal matters, since few lawyers are proactive when it comes to matters concerning the Korean government, experienced in criminal matters for foreigners or willing to upset the status quo (aggressively engage the prosecutor and court). Please do

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Korea’s Improper Solicitation and Graft Act: Kim Young-ran Act

The Improper Solicitation and Graft Act of Korea (“Graft Act”) was enacted on March of 2015 and came into effect in September of 2016. Korea’s Anti-Corruption and Civil Rights Commission published in English and Korea a decent Handbook to the Graft Act.  The Handbook to the Improper Solicitation and Graft Act of Korea may be found at: Handbook to Korea’s Graft Act.  It is worth a read. Please check back to this blog.  We shall be writing over the next couple of weeks articles on: Scope of Application of the Improper Solicitation and Graft Act of Korea. Hypothetical Improper Solicitations in Korea

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Korean Government Official Prosecuted in U.S. for Violation of Korean Law? Application of Korean Law in U.S. Courts

Is it really true?  A foreign government official may be prosecuted in the United States for the violation of a non-U.S. law – Yes/No – not exactly. A Korean working for a Korean government research center was, recently, found guilt of U.S. federal money laundering in a U.S. Federal Court.  The individual was convicted of utilizing the banking system of the United States to store and transfer illegal obtained funds.  The funds were deemed illegally obtained under Korean Law.  So yes, the interpretation of Korean Law was necessary. According to a Press Release by the Central District of California’s U.S.

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English-Speaking Criminal Defense Team Lead by Retired Korean Presiding Judge

IPG’s Criminal Defense team is lead by a leading Korean criminal defense attorney – retired Judge SJ Kook. Judge Kook, to date, has earned, for clients, over 60 not guilty verdicts.  He works on may Korean criminal matters with Sean Hayes, a retired prosecutor and internationally-experienced Korean attorneys.  Judge Kook is a graduate of Seoul National University and Columbia Law School.  He retired as a presiding judge. For more info on IPG please see: www.ipglegal.com IPG’s Representative Criminal Defense Cases: Not guilty verdict for an American military officer charged with the crime of rape in Korea. Not guilty verdicts for

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The Signs of a Great Criminal Lawyer in Korea | English-Speaking Criminal Defense Lawyers in Seoul

There are few great English-fluent criminal defense lawyers working in Korea, because of the nature of the Korean criminal justice system and other Korean realities.  It is even more difficult to find competent English-speaking criminal defense attorneys outside of Seoul. In Korea, in all cases, where you are accused of a crime and you fear that you may be sentenced to time in a Korean jail, may be deported from Korea or the Korean conviction may harm your future – hire, quickly, an experienced and proactive attorney in Korea with experience in Korean criminal law prior to any interrogations by

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Korea’s Anti-corruption/Anti-Graft Law: Kim Young-ran Law Implementation in Korea

Korea’s Anti-graft Law shall be effective on most companies doing business in Korea on September 28, 2016. Call your lawyer in Korea and get your lawyer to write you a memo on the issue.  The law will have, immediate, effects on most companies doing business in Korea. Korea, based on calls from civic groups and some in the media criticized the powers that be in Korea that Korea was lax on white-collar crime.  These individuals, among other arguments, claimed it is near impossible to succeed in business in Korea without resorting to corruption. The Chair of the Anti-Corruption and Civil

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Director Liability Insurance in Korea: Follow the Oxy Reckitt Beckiser

A great lawyer is hard to find – a lawyer is too hard to lose. The best lawyers, in Korea, often don’t work for the ubiquitous/”leading” law firms, because of Korean realities.  This is known by many Koreans and it is why Koreans shop around for the best lawyer for the specific case. Too often, we see foreign defendants in criminal cases that choose to maintain the same “corporate” firm for criminal matters.  This is not always the best move and we can see in many of the most noteworthy cases that this is not, always, the rule.  Realize that

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The Law of Self-Defense in Korea: Criminal Law Basics in Korea

The affirmative defense of self-defense is available in Korea.  A court, in Korea, that rules that an act was perpetrated in self-defense must dismiss or mitigate the punishment of the defendant. Typical Korean Court Criminal Act Article 21 (Self-Defense)(1) An act which is performed in order to prevent impending and unjust infringement of one’s own or another person’s legal interest shall not be punishable if there are reasonable grounds for that act. (2) When a preventive act has exceed normal limits, the punishment may be mitigated or remitted according to the extenuating circumstances. (3) In the case of the preceding

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Mr. Song Sings a Sobering Song of Freedom: “Emergency Situation” as a Defense to Drunk Driving Charge in Korea Upheld

I usually don’t write about such mundane legal issues, but the facts here are too interesting.  Mr. Song called a Designated Driver Service to drive him home after a night of drinking with high school friends. In Korea, you can call a Designated Driver to drive you home. The drivers, typically, arrive via public transportation or are dropped off via a motorbike.  The job is considered one of the lower-level jobs in Korea.  The fee for the service is, similar to the fee for a taxi. The Designated Driver and Mr. Song got into a verbal altercation that led to

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Changes to Korea’s Franchise Law May Lead to an Increased Potential for Criminal Sanctions: Franchise Law Basics

The Fair Transactions in Franchise Business Act of Korea was amended on August 13, 2013 and became effective on August 14, 2014.  The, facial, reason for the change in the Act is noted in an announcement by the Korean government on the reason for the amendment.  The facial reason for the amendment shows the rationale for imposing criminal sanctions for acts that don’t constitute “crimes.” Korean Government’s Stated Reason for the Amendment: “Recently, there is a rapid and growing tendency to engage in franchising because of the growth of the retired population, an unemployment crisis and the easiness in establishing

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Definition of Rape in Korea Elaborated on by the Korean Supreme Court: Criminal Law Basics

A recent decision by the Supreme Court of Korea may make defending against rape charges a little easier for defendants. The Defendant in the case was convicted by a Korean District and High Court for rape and was sentenced to 1 1/2 years in jail. Facts Found by the CourtThe Supreme Court found, among other things, the following facts: Defendant was the ex-boyfriend of the Accuser; The Accuser had a boyfriend; The Accuser was drunk and the Defendant may have been drunk at the night of the alleged rape; The Accuser and the Defendant met each other “spontaneously” and drank

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Korean Supreme Court Rules Contingency Fees for Criminal Cases Illegal

The Korean Supreme Court has, recently, ruled that an attorney’s contingency fees in criminal cases are against public policy, and are, therefore, illegal in Korea. The Supreme Court of Korea cited two bodies of law to arrive at its decision: Korea’s Civil Act and the Korean Attorney-at-Law Act. Article 103 of Korea’s Civil Act (Juristic Acts Contrary to Social Order) states that a “juristic act that is contrary to good morals and social order shall be null and void.” Article 1 of the Attorney-at-Law Act states that the “mission of any attorney-at-law shall be to defend fundamental human rights and

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South Korea moves to Remove Statute of Limitation on Murder

In South Korea, murder has a 25-year statute of limitations. This means that someone cannot be prosecuted for committing murder 25 years after the murder was committed. A review committee of the National Assembly’s Legislation and Judiciary Committee on Wednesday has just pushed through a bill that would remove the statutory 25-year statute of limitations on murder. The bill now awaits approval at the Assembly’s plenary session on July 24, 2015. The revision would not apply to manslaughter (a lesser form of homicide lacking adequate “malice” to qualify as a murder) or parricide (the killing of one’s parents). The move

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South Korea’s Military Conscription Law Challenged by Religious Conscientious Objectors

South Korea’s mandatory military conscription law is once again being challenged by religious conscientious objectors. The Constitutional Court held a public hearing on Thursday to determine whether religious objectors to military service are still subject to the same punishments that are given to other citizens who refuse to perform their military service. South Korean law mandates that citizens who refuse to perform military service, without a valid reason, are subject to imprisonment for up to three years. Currently, religious conscientious objections are not recognized as a valid reason to not serve.  The Constitutional Court upheld the conscription law when it

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Bail Granted in Korea for Alleged Violations of Korean Banking Laws

We are proud to announce that we, recently, prevailed in a white-collar criminal matter concerning an alleged crime involving violations of Korea’s Banking Laws.  The allegations stemmed from transactions between a payment processor and a major Korean financial institution.  Bail was granted for the non-Korean banker/businessman and, promptly, upon the granting of the bail by the Korean court, the Seoul Prosecution decided to drop all charges against our client.  In Korea, it is very difficult to obtain bail in cases that are being vigorously pursued by the Prosecution.  The conviction rate, in Korea, is greater than 99%. We are proud

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Child Abuse in Korea – “Professionals” Required to Report Crime: Sentences Increased & Police Receiving More Training on the Needs of Victims

Most crimes, in Korea, related to the most vulnerable in society are seeing more attention by the police & prosecution and greater sentences from judges – child abuse is no exception. In Korea, child abuse may be punished under the Act on Special Cases Related to the Punishment etc. of Child Abuse Crimes (아동학대범죄의 처벌 등에 관한 특례법).  Some individuals may be held civilly liable (fined) for not reporting child abuse. The law defines a child as anyone under the age of 18 (legal – Western age).  To report a crime, it is advisable to contact your local police office

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