Proposed Korean Law Aims to Break In-App Purchase Monopolies of Apple and Google

In an article that appeared in The Register, it was reported that legislators in Korea are proposing a law that aims to break the monopolies of App Stores such as Google and Apple. In-app purchase (IAP) is defined by Real Simple as “any fee (beyond the initial cost of downloading the app, if there is one) an app may ask for.” Currently Google and Apple require their app developers to use their in-app payment services when someone wishes to make

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The Weekly Docket: Korean Legal News from International Law Firm IPG Legal

Last week’s Recap of the Top Legal Headlines in South Korea for the week of July 12, 2021: Korean government seeks to improve the legal status of animals Netflix appeals against first trial defeat in Seoul, Korea over network fees R-Rated Minecraft reignites controversy over Korean game classification laws Korean Government to strengthen social distancing measures in remote areas Anti Bullying laws in Korea face further scrutiny You may also schedule a free initial consultation with a lawyer if you

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Whistleblower Protections in Korea Expanded through revised Whistleblower Protection Act

Korea’s Whistleblower Protection Act is, often, criticized for having a too limited scope, since it narrowly covered specific iterated Korean government statutes. Thus, many in Korea have pushed for an expansion of the law to cover a more broad range of Korean laws. With this reality in mind, the Korean Whistleblower Protection Act was expanded to cover 467 statutes up from the prior 284 statutes. The amendment was effective since November of 2020. This Amendment led to many Korean government

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New Korean Corruption Investigative Unit Established to Investigate High-Ranking Public Officials in Korea

Korean established a new investigative unit with the independent power to investigate High-Ranking Public Officials, family members of High-Ranking Public Officials and those associated in alleged crimes with High-Ranking Public Officials. This office shall be called the Corruption Investigation Office (“CIO”) for High-Ranking Public Officials. This independent investigative agency’s scope of power includes the investigation of the President of Korea, members of the Korean National Assembly, prosecutors, judges, senior public officials (Rank of Grade III or higher) and some senior

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Sean Hayes Ranked a Top 100 Lawyer in South Korea by Asia Business Law Journal

IPG is proud to announce that Sean Hayes was awarded the designation as one of the Top 100 lawyers working in South Korea by the Asia Business Law Journal. He is one of only a handful of non-Korean lawyers on this list of the best lawyers in Korea. Sean is, also, ranked a top attorney in numerous other leading rankings and IPG Legal was rated Korea’s Top Dispute Resolution Law Firm of the Year for three years in a row.

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Sean Hayes Invited to Chair Panel for Horasis Foundation

Sean Hayes shall chair a panel for the Horasis Foundantion’s Conference in Seoul, Korea. The Horasis Foundation shall hold the conference on September 22 to the 24th. The Conference is entitled: Entrepreneurship: Balancing Disruption and Consent. Participants at the conference shall include the Chairman of Hansol, the UN Special Envoy for Disaster Risk Reduction, Chairmen of two leading Indian pharmaceuticals, the Chief Investment Officer for IFC, a Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs, a former Prime Minister of Japan, a Former

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Working with Korean Lawyers and Law Firms

The China Law Blog has a great post on working with Korean and Chinese lawyers and law firms. The post notes, in part, concerning Korean law firms that: 1. Non-responsiveness is the norm. American lawyers generally see their role as helping clients achieve their goals and keeping their clients informed. Korean lawyers operate far more independently. They consider themselves the legal experts and can get offended when questioned. According to their perspective, a client should trust them, not ask questions,

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Opening Door to Legal Change

By Sean Hayes (Korea Times 03/05/2009) On Monday, the National Assembly passed a bill that permits law firms from countries with free trade agreements with Korea to operate “foreign law consultancy businesses” and individuals from these countries to be registered as “foreign legal consultants.” At present, the best estimate is that over 400 foreign attorneys work and reside in Korea. The vast majority are Koreans. These attorneys work for law firms, accounting firms, and corporations. Many of these attorneys play

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