Obtaining a Korean Criminal Record Check from Outside of Korea

A Korean Law Firm may obtain for you – your personal Korean criminal record.  In most cases, the law firm is required to obtain a notarized and apostatized power of attorney and a notarized copy of your passport.  A Korean criminal record, normally, takes around a week to obtain. A Korean criminal record is called a Criminal Investigative Record Check (범죄수사경력회보서).  If you are interested in obtaining a confirmation that you have no criminal record or require your criminal record, please send us an email and we can arrange this for you. [ABTM id=1137]

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Korean Wills: Korean Estate Law Basics

Like in most jurisdictions, the recognition of a will by a court of law requires precise formalities.  We advise that most people have a will.  For individuals with wills that shall be governed by Korean Law the formalities are noted below.  We have omitted two forms of wills – a will by audio recording and dictation. These types of wills pose issues of authentication of the decadent and we believe it is not advisable – in most cases. Korean Holographic Wills A Holographic will is a handwritten will.  For a holographic will to be enforceable in Korea the will should meet the following formalities: Written by the decadent Dated Signed Note the decadents name and address Sealed or contain a thumbprint. Additional details on holographic will may be found at: Korean Holographic Wills  Korean Notarized Wills Will is executed before a Korean notary Two witnesses should be present at the notary

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Grounds for Divorce in Korea: Korean Divorce Law Basics

Foreigners may file, in most cases, for divorce in Korea if one party to the divorce resides in Korea or the parties agree to the jurisdiction of the Korean Family Court or local Korean court.  Korean does not restrict those under SOFA, diplomats and non-permanent residents from filing for divorce in Korea. However, if the non-filing party to a divorce wishes to stay married, the filing party must prove that his or her hands are cleaner than the non-filing spouse and must establish adequate grounds for divorce.  The Grounds for Divorce in Korea are noted below.  The family courts, in Korea, have strictly interpreted the grounds for divorce. In most cases of foreigners divorcing, it is advisable to find a proactive Korean Divorce Lawyer. The reality is that few divorce lawyers in Korea are proactive and few are experienced with divorce among foreigners.  The English language capability coupled with experience,

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Korea Blockchain Law Society Founded: Korean Crptocurrency Law Updates

The inaugural meeting of the Blockchain Law Society of Korea was held last week.  We wrote on the Korean Law Blog articles on Korean Blockchain/Alt Currency Law and shall be participating in the Blockchain Law Society and updating the reader on issues addressed by the Blockchain Law Society.  You shall find more articles on Blockchain, Alt currenices, Korean Crypto-currency Law and like topics on this blog over the next couple of months. We are looking forward to more lively discussions and hope that the Korean Blockchain Law society shall lead to a comprehensive Korean CryptoCurrency -Blockchain Law that does not lead to destruction of a unique and potentially profitable business opportunity for entrepreneurs in Korea and entrepreneurs that wish to invest in Korea.  We hope that foreign investors are, also, considered in these meetings and in the drafting of these laws.  Foreign investors play a key part in Korean business and locking

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Confession Prior to Arrest in Korea: Korean Sentencing Law Basics

Some crimes in Korea require the victim’s consent for the prosecutor to indict a victim, the most literal translation of these types of crimes are “Crimes Not Punished Against the Will of the Victim.” Additionally, a “Self Denunciation” (Confession to Korean Investigative Agency Prior to Arrest ) may mitigate punishment (Korean Criminal Act Article 52).  The difference between these types of crimes and the formality in confessing may forego the opportunity to avoid a jail sentence. All good Korean criminal defense lawyers, at a minimum, should be aware of this specific issue, confession formalities and, also, be aware of the need, in many cases, to proactively engage alleged victims. Korean Confessions/Self-Denunciation in Sentencing Law in Korea  Criminal Act of Korea, Article 52 (1) When self-denunciation is made to competent authorities who have the responsibility to investigate the crimes, the punishment may be mitigated or remitted. (2) The preceding paragraph shall apply

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Korean Entrapment Law: Korean Criminal Procedure Law Basics

The use of the Entrapment Defense in Korea depends on if the actions of the police/investigators have “induced” the suspect to commit a crime or merely provided an “opportunity” for the suspect to commit a crime.  The “crime inducing” act by the Korean government is a criminal defense to the alleged consummated crime.  The main job of the court in determining if the crime was induced is to determine the intent of the suspect at the time of the alleged inducing action by the Korean police/investigator. The Korean Supreme Court clarified this entrapment criminal defense rule in a case disposed of in the Fall of 2005. The Supreme Court of Korea acknowledged that entrapment likely occurred in a case that concerned a paid informant and the smuggling of drugs from China to Korea. The informant, according to the defendants, asserted that the importation of the drugs was to assist the government efforts to fight drug

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Wills, Trusts, Pre-Nuptial Agreements, Living Wills, and Power of Attorneys in Korea

We receive numerous calls requesting the notarization of wills, living wills, general and specific power of attorneys, prenuptial agreements and other like agreements and documents in Korea. These documents are, often, just pulled from the internet.  Pulling these documents from the internet is not adequate – in most cases. We, sometimes, notarize these agreements for clients, however, in most cases we refer the client to their local embassy in Seoul, since the embassy stamp has a far less chance of not being recognized in a foreign jurisdiction than a Korean notarial stamp.  We, often, also, advise a redraft of the document. This post was not written to tell you not to call me about notarial issues (actually don’t contact me about notarial issues unless your nation does not have an embassy in Korea- contact your embassy), but to be aware that many of the agreements and documents that I have

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Korean Medical Malpractice Arbitration Law

Korean Medical Malpractice lawsuits are often compared to “Beating one’s head against the wall,” since Korean medical malpractice lawsuit are, typically, difficult for patients to prevail in.  In medical malpractice cases, in Korea, and in most developed jurisdictions, the plaintiff has the duty to establish, among other things, a nexus between the alleged injury and the actions or in actions of the doctor.  Proving this nexus is, often, difficult because of the apprehension of expert witnesses (doctors) to step on the toes of other doctors, cost of obtaining neutral experts and lack of adequate legal resources for injured patients. One valid means of obtaining a remedy, in a cost effective manner, is via Korea’s Medical Dispute Medication & Arbitration Agency (“KMDMA”). However, under the prior Act on Remedies for Injuries from Medical Malpractice and Mediation of Medical Disputes (abbreviated as “Medical Dispute Mediation Act”) the a plaintiff was, only, able to

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Civil Court Proceedings in Korean Courts: Korean Civil Litigation Basics

The following is a timetable-based outline of Korean Civil Court Proceedings at Korean Courts.  Please note, this is the typical civil court proceedings and exceptions do and, often, exist at Korean civil courts.  Korean civil courts are less procedure focused than U.S., British, German and other Western nations’ courts, thus, allowing more flexibility for judges and the parties. The proceedings at Korean courts of first instance is, typically, completed within one year from the filing the complaint to a district court and appeals to the High Court in Korea (court of second instance), typically, is completed with ten months of filing the appeal to the Korean High Court.  Appeals to the Korean Supreme Court may, sometimes, take multiple years to complete. We have excluded from this list proceedings within the Constitutional Court of Korea, Korean Family Courts, the Korean Administrative Courts, Patent Courts, Small Claims courts and other special courts. 

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Korea’s Improper Solicitation and Graft Act: Kim Young-ran Act

The Improper Solicitation and Graft Act of Korea (“Graft Act”) was enacted on March of 2015 and came into effect in September of 2016.  Korea’s Anti-Corruption and Civil Rights Commission published in English and Korea a decent Handbook to the Graft Act.  The Handbook may be found at: Handbook to Korea’s Graft Act.  All companies doing business in Korea should understand compliance basics and have an understanding of the myriad of compliance rules.  The Graft Act is, only, the tip of the iceberg.  We shall be focusing on Korean compliance basics over the next couple of months on this blog.  The Moon Administration and the Korean FTA have aggressively acted upon alleged malfeasance in Korean companies and this is a time to consider a compliance audit, redrafting of compliance policies and procedures and, potentially, your employment rules. Please check back to the Korean Law Blog.  We shall be writing over the

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South Korean Act on International Judicial Mutual Assistance in Civil Matters: Obtaining Evidence via Korean Courts and the Korean Government for use in Proceedings Abroad

In some cases in Korean courts, it is advisable to obtain evidence held in a foreign jurisdiction for use in a Korean civil proceeding in a Korean court.  The need often assists in establishing damages, course of dealings or the basis of liability.  Additionally, in cases in non-Korean courts, evidence held in Korea may be useful in these foreign court proceedings for similar reasons.  The Korean Act on International Judicial Mutual Assistance in Civil Matters sets out specific requirements that need to be met before the Korean government may order the production of this requested evidence. We have assisted foreign law firms in obtaining evidence in Korea and, also, we have requested evidence from foreign jurisdictions in pending cases in Korea.  Korea has, thankful, improved, in recent years, its protocols for handling requests from foreign courts. Please note, in a Korean lawsuit a Korean judge may request from a foreign

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USA Today cites The Korean Law Blog and IPG Attorney Sean Hayes on Casino Gambling Law

An article in USA Today on Casino Gambling in Korea cites The Korean Law Blog and the main author of this blog on Casino Gambling in Korea.  The article may be found at:  South Korea wants to build casino industry where all are welcome but Koreans. The article notes, in part, that: “According to the Korea Center on Gambling Problems, which was established by the government in 2012, the prevalence of gambling addiction is two-to-three times higher in Korea than in other major countries. While it’s unclear how those statistics are compiled, the notion that Koreans are uniquely susceptible to gambling addiction is a widespread social theory that informs the laws surrounding the issue.” [ABTM id=1137]

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Digital Forensic Reviews at the Korean Fair Trade Commission

The Fair Trade Commission of Korea (“KFTC”) implemented in April 2018 rules governing the review of digital evidence in investigations of businesses at the KFTC.  The rules are entitled the Regulations on Collection, Analysis and Management of Digital Evidence (“Digital Forensic Evidence Review Rules”).  The rules have changed the manner of executing investigations at the KFTC in cases where the KFTC perceives a need for a detailed forensic audit. As of 2017, the KFTC has engaged in digital investigations via a division named the “Digital Investigation and Analysis Division.”  This Division hired technical computer staff that is assisting in investigations.  This Digital Investigation and Analysis Division has engaged in aggressive gathering of forensic evidence from companies. The key aspect of the Regulations on Collection, Analysis and Management of Digital Evidence is to put in place procedures for the handling, storage, collection, security, disposal and processing of digital evidence in order to increase

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Enforcement of Arbitral Awards in Korean Courts: Arbitration Law Basics

After an arbitration panel outside of Korea renders an arbitral award against a Korean company or individual, typically, if the non-prevailing party lacks assets outside of Korea or the prevailing party needs to enjoin acts in Korea, the prevailing party chooses to enforce the arbitration award in Korea.  Enforcement is not as easy as just giving arbitral awards to non-prevailing Korean parties.  For enforcement of foreign judgments in Korean courts please see: Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in Korean Courts.  When enforcing foreign arbitral awards in Korea, Article 37(1) & (2) of the Arbitration Act of Korea comes into play, thus, leading to the need to apply Korean Law to the enforcement of the arbitral awards and utilize a Korean court for enforcement. The good news is that in 2016, the Arbitration Act of Korea was amended to, among other things, allow for a quicker and less cumbersome manner of enforcing

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Korean FTC Criminal Referral Guidelines: Monopoly & Franchise Korean Law Updates

The Fair Trade Commission of Korea (“Korean FTC” or “KFTC”) amended the Korean FTC’s Criminal Referral Guidelines (“Amended Guidelines”) to motivate more active and aggressive enforcement of Korea’s Franchise, Monopoly and other related laws.  We have seen a much more active enforcement of Korean law by the Korean FTC and expect more criminal referrals. The Amended KFTC’s Criminal Referral Guidelines places a very low threshold for referring a case for a criminal prosecution of employees and companies.  The Amended Guidelines are effective since April 9, 2018. Prior to the present amendment, the prior Guidelines emphasized on, mainly, making criminal referral against key management and company representatives that were alleged to have taken in part in “high level” violations.  The Amended Guidelines places a bulls eye also non-management employees and lowers the threshold for referring a case for prosecution. The Guidelines notes that adjudicating officers shall look, mainly, to: (a) the

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Basics to Successfully Outsourcing Production of your Product to Korea: Korea OEM Basics

So you have decided to outsource the manufacturing of your products to Korea. Good choice in choosing quality-focused Korea over quantity-focused China, but don’t make the bad choice of not considering basic basic legal due diligence necessary to protect your good name, technology, brand and the future of your business. If you plan on just dealing through a purchase order (PO) in Korea, you are heading down a path that may lead to a kick in the behind. The recession hit small/medium-sized manufacturers even harder than large manufacturers. Many of these SMEs have decided that the only way to survive is OEM (original equipment manufacturing) outsourcing to China, India, and other parts of Asia. I, also, do a good deal of enjoyable work in China. I am, however, always happy to see clients choose Korea over China, since many of the headaches you will experience in China and India will never

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Korea’s Occupational Safety and Health Act Amendments for 2018 (OSHA Korea Updates)

Because of the perceived need, in Korea, to protect workers’ emotional and physical health in the service sector, the Occupational Safety & Health Act of Korea (“OSHA Korea”) was amended.  The major OSHA Korea amendments impose a: Duty on Employers to Protect the Emotional & Physical Health of Employees  The OSHA Korea Amendment mandates employers, in the service sector, to protect the emotional and physical health of employees from abusive acts of customers.  We do not, yet, have substantial details on the actions needed to be taken by employers to meet these legal obligations.  Enforcement actions against employees and an enforcement decree shall shed light on the specifics and we shall update the reader when more is known.We advise that employers in the service sector review policies in place in order for employers to not run afoul of the new OSHA law.  It seems like a proactive approach that includes

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Dismissal of Employees in Korea: Supreme Court of Korea Precedent

The Korean Supreme Court ruled, in March of 2018, that a company may terminate employees for one incident of employee gambling.  The case stems from the termination of drivers that were caught on one occasion gambling prior to driving buses. The lower courts ruled, in short, that gambling was not a serious enough offense to justify termination since: The act of gambling, only, occurred on one occasion and thus trust between the employee and employer has not broken down; The employees performed their job functions adequately; and The non-termination of employment of the employees would not significantly interfere with the ability of the employer to successful continue its business- if the employees do not engage in these acts in the future. The Supreme Court reversed the decision of the lower court and noted that: Gambling could effect the rest period of the drivers and the job of the drivers requires

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Barriers to Trade in the Korean Franchising Industry

The Office of the United States Trade Representative issues an annual report that details issues that concern the ability of United States companies to do business abroad.  One interesting component of the this report, that may concern some international franchise systems in Korea, is addressed in the report.  The 2018 National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers notes under Korean Franchising that: “U.S. stakeholders have raised concerns for several years about the activities of the National Commission on Corporate Partnership, now renamed the Korea Commission on Corporate Partnership (KCCP), which imposed restrictions on the expansion of some U.S.-owned restaurant franchises and opened proceedings looking into numerous other sectors as well. The KCCP is a partially government-funded organization, created by Korea’s National Assembly with a mandate to mediate complaints of unfair or unequal competition between large and small businesses. The KCCP’s mission, according to its government appointed chairperson, is to level the

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Overview of North Korean Legal System & Law Online

Professor Patricia Goedde wrote, many years back, a decent basic explanation of the basics of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s Legal system.  The article is worth a read if you are interested in a basic explanation of the North Korean legal system.  Please note the bottom of the article lists a decent list of North Korean legal resources. The article on the North Korean Legal System may be found at:  North Korean Legal System and Legal Research [ABTM id=1137]

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