Korean Real Estate Acquisition Taxes for Purchase of Real Estate in Korea

The following are the Korean real estate acquisition taxes for the purchase of real estate in Korea. These acquisition taxes are applicable to the purchase of an apartment, land or a commercial property. Taxes in Korea change, often, when new administrations come into office.  Thus, these taxes may change, thus, please consult with your real estate agent and/or accountant. Foreigner may purchase property in Korea, certain restrictions do apply to the purchase of property by foreigners. Basic Taxes Related to the Acquisition of Property in Korea.  Acquisition Tax (with surtax):     4.6% of Purchase Price Recording Tax:      

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Can a Foreign Company be Deemed a Domestic Company for Tax Purposes and Taxed on Worldwide Income?

If Korea deems a foreign incorporated company a Domestic Corporation, the company shall be taxed on its worldwide income.  The relevant law, this determination is made under, is the Corporate Tax Act of Korea (“CTA”).  In the typical case, the National Tax Service of Korea designates the foreign-incorporated company a Domestic Corporation and requests details on overseas earnings in order to impose taxes on overseas earnings.  Of course this leads, invariable, to your Korean tax lawyer challenging the determination to the Korean courts. Domestic Company Tax Residency Test in Korea The Korean Corporate Tax Act defines a Domestic Corporation as

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Provisional Attachments of Assets in Pending Litigation in Korea Courts

A party attempting to collect on a debt or potential liability based on breach of contract or torts in Korea may obtain a Provisional Attachment of an Asset. Another useful tool to expedite proceeding in a Korean civil matter is to Obtain a Payment Order from a Korean Court.  A provisional attachment is considered provisional, since the attachment is executed prior to the final judgement. The, facial, purpose of a provisional attachment is to secure assets necessary for enforcement in cases where a defendant may conceal or dispose of assets. However, a provisional attachment, often, encourages settlement. We advise most creditors attempting

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Does Korea have Common Law Marriage?: Korean Common Law Marriage (De Facto Marriage) Basics

While the concept of a Korean Common Law Marriage (since Korea has no concept of a Common Law) does not exist, Korea has a similar law than the laws, in the States, often referred to as Common Law marriage.  FYI – few U.S. States recognize common law marriage. In Korea, the concept of Common Law Marriage is referred to as De Facto Marriage.  In Korea, all “legal marriages” are marriages that are registered at the local town office or recognized via marriage abroad (comity).  The De Facto Marriage is a limited exception to this “legal marriage” concept.  The following is

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Korean Inheritance Law: Who Inherits What, When & How in Korea?

If a decadent, governed by Korea’s Inheritance Law, dies without a will (intestate succession) the estate of decadent shall pass according to Korea’s Intestate Succession Law.  The key points of Korean Intestate Succession Law and Korean Inheritance Law is noted below.  We deal with many cases, at our law firm in Korea, where a Korean family member requests a U.S. or European family member to disclaim an inheritance.  Normally, a form is provided to the foreign family member.  We suggest understanding the situation and understanding what you are disclaiming.  For an article on this issue please see: Disclaiming an Inheritance

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Korean Statute of Limitation in Civil Cases in Korea

The period of the Korean statute of limitation varies based on the type of wrong/breach, type of parties to the case and details of the matter.  The list below is a non-exclusive list of the major Korean Statute of Limitations. The following is an overview of the major periods of the statute of limitations in Korea.  Statute of Limitation law is considered a part of the substantive law and not mere procedural law in Korea.  The following is a list of the major Korean statute of limitations.  The list is not exhaustive.   10-Year Statute of Limitation in Korea Contractual Claims

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Increased Scrutiny of Employers by Korean’s Ministry of Employment & Labor under President Moon’s Administration: HR Audit Needed by Korean Employment Lawyers

Many Korean Employment Lawyers are taking note of the recent initiative by Korea’s Ministry of Employment & Labor.  At the end of June of 2017, the Ministry announced an “Unfair Labor Practice Eradication Initiative.” This Initiative intends to investigate and punish perceived “unfair labor practices” of employers in Korea by having the Ministry of Employment & Labor conduct more audits of companies and provide punishment for those perceived to be in violation of Korea’ Labor Law.  It is time to do an internal audit of the labor practices of your company.  The audits completed by Labor Lawyers (not actually lawyers

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Grounds for Divorce in Korea: Korean Divorce Law Basics

Foreigners may file, in most cases, for divorce in Korea if one party to the divorce resides in Korea r the parties agree to the jurisdiction of the Korean Court.  Korean does not restrict those under SOFA, diplomats and non-permanent residents from filing divorce in Korea. However, if the non-filing party to a divorce wishes to stay married, the filing party must prove that his or her hands are cleaner than the non-filing spouse and must establish adequate grounds for divorce.  The Grounds for Divorce in Korea are noted below. In most cases of foreigners divorcing, it is advisable to

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English-speaking Korean lawyers and International Lawyers at International Law Firm in Korea discussing issues of Korean Law

IPG Legal is a leading client-focused international law firm with offices in Korea that is, often, selected over the ubiquitous Korean Law Firms when success is essential and success depends on nuanced street-smart advice, proactive  and unconflicted representation. Our attorneys are, intentionally. different from the crowd.  From our retired judge partners to our junior associates, we are all trained with an intense focus on client success, lawyer proactivity, and to understand the nexus between your commercial and legal needs. Our attorneys shall never push to you useless memos, non-nuanced legal advice or get you into litigation without an honest assessment of

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Korean Distributor Sales Territory or Customer Restrictions in Korea: Korean Distributor law Agreements in Korea

Korea’s Distribution Law is governed, primarily, by the Commercial Code of Korea, Monopoly Regulation and Fair Trade Law of Korea (FTL) and the, newly enacted, Fairness in Distributor Transactions Act of Korea.  These laws comprise a substantial body of law that is consistently evolving. The main regulatory body enforcing the FTL of Korea is the Fair Trade Commission of Korea (“FTC”).  The Fair Trade Laws of Korea, in most cases, creates the most significant risk for suppliers and manufacturers doing business with distributors in Korea.  A nuanced understand coupled with a proactive approach to your distributors is necessary in succeeding in

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Liquidated Damages vs. Penalty Damages: Korean Contract Law Basics

Liquidated Damages v. Penalty Damages in Korea In Korea, liquidated damage clauses in South Korean contracts may be invalidated if the liquidated damage amount is deemed, by a Korean court of law, as “unduly excessive.” (Civil Act Art. 398(2)). Article 398 of the Civil Act may be found below.  Korean Liquidated damages law is governed by the Civil Act of Korea and related Korean Law. However, if an agreement, in Korea, notes a “penalty,” the amount of the “penalty is presumed to be determined in advance of the damages” (Civil Act Art. 398(4)) and is presumed valid.  Of course, the

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English-Speaking Arbitration Attorneys in Korea

International arbitration between Korean companies and American, Australian, British, Chinese, Indian, German and other nation companies is on the increase.  Regrettably, few Korean attorneys are capable of handling international arbitration cases in the English language, because of the lack of experience in complex international arbitration and the lack of adequate English language skills.  The reality is Korea has few English-speaking arbitration attorneys capable of handling complex international arbitration matters, thus, many firms have turned to foreign attorneys to fill this glaring gap.   Sean Hayes is the author of the he Korean Law Blog .  English-speaking Korean attorneys contribute to this

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English-Speaking Criminal Defense Lawyers in Korea: Defense Lawyers to Hire and Not to Hire?

In all cases, in Korea, where you are accused of a crime and you fear that you may be sentenced to time in jail, may be deported or the conviction may harm your future, hire, quickly, an experienced and proactive English-Fluent Korean criminal defense lawyers prior to any interrogations by the Korean police or prosecution. Sadly, few lawyers, in Korea, are useful for criminal matters, since few lawyers are proactive when it comes to matters concerning the Korean government, experienced in criminal matters for foreigners or willing to upset the status quo (aggressively engage the prosecutor and court). Please do

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Termination after Childcare Leave in Korea: Childcare Leave Law in Korea

Korea’s generous Childcare Leave Law poses difficulties to many smaller employers in Korea.  The Childcare Leave Law, in Korea, allows for a one year period of leave per child under the age of seven. Employers, often, are required to hire a replacement employee when the employee departs for this childcare leave.  This situation, often, leads to an employee returning to employment with little to no work to do. So can an employer, in Korea, layoff the returning Korean worker for the lack of a position for the worker? The answer is, typically, NO.  Notwithstanding, the issue of tenure and the

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Korea Notarizations, Apostille, Powers of Attorney, Consularizations, Legalizations of Korean Translations and Documents

Our Korean lawyers at our law firm in Korea receive numerous emails requesting our services in assisting with either legalization of a Korean translation for use in court, authentication, notarization or apostille of a Korean, Chinese, American, British, French, German, Russian or other country document for either use in Korea or use in another country. We, normally, receive these calls from a fellow attorney, a financial institution or an individual with the need for an important document to be “legalized” for an important transaction.  Many times these documents are required for foreign or Korean courts, administrative agencies and quasi-government institutions.

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Korea’s Improper Solicitation and Graft Act: Kim Young-ran Act

The Improper Solicitation and Graft Act of Korea (“Graft Act”) was enacted on March of 2015 and came into effect in September of 2016. Korea’s Anti-Corruption and Civil Rights Commission published in English and Korea a decent Handbook to the Graft Act.  The Handbook to the Improper Solicitation and Graft Act of Korea may be found at: Handbook to Korea’s Graft Act.  It is worth a read. Please check back to this blog.  We shall be writing over the next couple of weeks articles on: Scope of Application of the Improper Solicitation and Graft Act of Korea. Hypothetical Improper Solicitations in Korea

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Korean Government Official Prosecuted in U.S. for Violation of Korean Law? Application of Korean Law in U.S. Courts

Is it really true?  A foreign government official may be prosecuted in the United States for the violation of a non-U.S. law – Yes/No – not exactly. A Korean working for a Korean government research center was, recently, found guilt of U.S. federal money laundering in a U.S. Federal Court.  The individual was convicted of utilizing the banking system of the United States to store and transfer illegal obtained funds.  The funds were deemed illegally obtained under Korean Law.  So yes, the interpretation of Korean Law was necessary. According to a Press Release by the Central District of California’s U.S.

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Can you Revise Employment Rules in Korea without the Agreement of Employees?

The Guidebook on Wage System Reform, published by the Korean Ministry of Employment & Labor, has sparked more interest, in the private sector, than the revamping of Korea’s wage system based on seniority. The major issue, in this regard, is if the Rules of Employment of a company may be amended, without violating the Labor Standards Act of Korea (“LSA”), when “wage system reform” is not consented to by a majority of the employees or the trade union. Numerous Korean government agencies have successfully moved to a more merit-based promotion and bonus system from a strict seniority-based wage system.  The

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English-Speaking Korean Labor & Employment Lawyers in Korea

This Korean Law Blog is brought to you by English-speaking Korean labor lawyers & employment lawyers working for IPG Legal – an international law firm with offices in Korea.  Sean is the author of this blog and English-speaking Korean lawyers contribute to the blog.  Please find below a few of the most recent matters we have worked on. Leading rating services have rated IPG attorneys as leading lawyers working in Korea and throughout Asia. To learn mall, please drop us an email or give us a call.         IPG’s Korean Labor & Employment Law Team Experience Drafted

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Korean Bankruptcy Court in Seoul, Korea Established

Korea, in March 2017, established the Seoul Bankruptcy Court.  The Seoul Bankruptcy Court replaces the Seoul Central District Court’s Bankruptcy Division.  The establishment of the Seoul Bankruptcy Court is welcome news for most Seoul-based practitioners. Seoul Bankruptcy Court The Seoul Bankruptcy Court is the first separate bankruptcy court in Korea.  The Seoul Bankruptcy Court was established because of a drastic increase in bankruptcy/insolvency filings over the last few years and a perceived need to have more efficient handling of bankruptcy cases. The major law governing bankruptcies, in Korea, is the Debtor Rehabilitation & Bankruptcy Act of Korea.  This Bankruptcy Act,

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