Korea’s Legal Measures to Reduce Fine Dust Pollution

The Korean Special Act on Fine Dust Abatement and Management (hereinafter as “Special Act on Fine Dust”) entered into force on February 15, 2019. The law, primarily, focus is restricting producers of fine dust to reduce the fine dust level in Korea. The Special Act on Fine Dust defines different types of dust and enables officials to set certain fine dust reduction measures. Legal Definitions of Fine Dust The Special Act on Fine Dust provides definitions of “fine dust,” “micro-fine dust” and “precursors to fine dusts”: “Fine dust” are particulate matters up to 10 micrometers in diameter. “Micro-fine dust” are particulate matters up to 2.5 micrometers in diameter. “Precursors to fine dusts” are sulfuric oxide, nitrogen oxide and volatile organic compounds. Reduction Measures against Fine Dust for Officials The Ministry of Environment publishes the respective limits on the concentration level of micro-fine dust daily. Mayors and governors in the affected

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Korean Data Privacy Act: Need for Compliance Audit for your Korean Company

The European Union General Data Protection Regulation (EU GDPR) focuses on the data security of personal data of users of the internet. As the EU offers a potentially lucrative market for online businesses for many Korean companies, South Korea was eager to amend its existing Act on the Promotion of IT Network Use and Information Protection of Korea (“Korean Network Act”) based, at least, partially on bench-marking of the EU GDPR. We suggest all companies, doing business in Korea, conduct via a professional in data privacy – a compliance audit. We suggest the professional has an understanding of not, only, Korean Law, but the law of the European Union as it relates to data privacy. Fines and criminal penalties for violation of data privacy laws have increased in Korea. Korean Network ActThe Korean Network Act was amended in December of 2018. Korea, the EU and other nations are in ongoing

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The Amendment to the Korean Pharmaceutical Affairs Act 2019

The Korean Pharmaceutical Affairs Act (hereinafter as “Pharma-Act”) was proposed by the Chair of the Health and Welfare Committee of Korea on December 27, 2018. The Pharma Act shall adds more cumbersome regulations on the foreign qualifications of pharmacists, increases the limits of penalty surcharges and shall change the system to transfer a Korean pharmacy businesses. This Amendment shall become effective in July 2019. The major amendments are detailed below. Key Highlights of the Korean Amendment to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act Criteria for the Qualification for the Korean Pharmacist Exam regarding Pharmacists Who Graduated from Foreign Colleges The current Art 3 Pharma-Act, as part of Section 1 – Qualifications and Licenses of Pharmacists states that a person, which wants to become a pharmacist “…shall obtain a license from the Minister of Health and Welfare.” A license shall be granted if an individual has a bachelor’s degree from a national institution

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National Database of Training Programs for Overseas Medical Service Workers in Korea

The National Assembly of the Republic of Korea recently passed the bill Amending the Act on Support for Overseas Expansion of Healthcare System and Attraction of International Patients (hereinafter as “Amendment to the Act on Overseas Expansion of Healthcare”), which major goal is to establish and operate a national database of medical training programs for foreign medical service workers. The Amendment shall be in force at the end of 2019. History of the Korean Act on Overseas Expansion of Healthcare In the early 2000s, Korea focused on expanding its medical services abroad, in order to attract more foreign patients. Therefore, the Korean government also created and started training programs with Korean private medical institutions for foreign medical service personnel. In addition, a large amount of public money was donated to such projects to support the success of such programs. However, there exists no general database of these medical training programs

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Korean Compliance Checklist for your Business in Korea

The following Korean Compliance Checklist is intended to provide, only, a basic overview of the necessaries for keeping the law and shareholders off your back.  We, highly, recommend having a compliance audit preformed – if you have not completed a compliance audit of your Korean business in the past or recently.   1.  Do you Have a Registered Company/Business? Operating in Korea is not as simple as just leasing an office.  All businesses whether in the form of a corporation or sole proprietorship in Korea are required to register as business with the tax office and local government offices.  For some businesses the approval of a government agency shall be required.  Other articles on Korean corporate forms may be found at: Establishing a Company in Korea: Under Revised Corporate Code Limited Liability Companies Under the Revised Korean Commercial Code 2.  Do you Have Employment Agreements, Employment Rules, License Agreements, Joint

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