Calculation of Overtime Hours for Maximum 52-Hour Workweek Law

A labor dispute leading to an indictment occurred between an employer and an employee concerning the calculation of Korean overtime work. In Korea, an employee is prohibited from working more than 52 hours each week (LSA, Article 53(1)). Thus, only 12 overtime hours are permitted to be worked each week over the normal working week of 40 hours. The dispute concerned the calculation of what constitutes these 12 overtime hours. The employer was indicted for a criminal charge under Article

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Not Paying Korean Statutory Severance to an Employee in Korea is a Crime

Korean Labor & Employment Law has strict and specific rules imposed on employers, running afoul of these rules can place a representative director/sole director or the individual employee responsible for the violation of law to face criminal and civil sanctions. The criminal sanctions can include a sentence of time in prison or large fines. For an article on severance obligations after a merger please see: Korean Statutory Severance Obligations After a Merger in Korea. For example, the Employee Retirement Benefit

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Occupational Safety in Korea: Serious Accidents Punishment Act

The Serious Accident Punishment Act (“SAPA”) was passed by the Korean National Assembly and came into effect on January 27, 2022. With the implementation and recent expansion of the SAPA, we encourage all employers to do a comprehensive compliance audit. Some law firms, including this one, have attorneys and staff that can assist your team in doing a comprehensive audit. SAPA has greatly expanded the list of accidents that are applicable and significantly increased the penalties for breaking the law.

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Without a Korean Employment Contract, can you bring a Claim against your Korean Employer for Breach of Contract or Labor Law Violations?

In Korea, an employment relationship is generally established through an employment contract between the employer and the employee. However, it’s important to note that an employment agreement can be either written or verbal. While a written contract is highly recommended to clearly define the rights and obligations of both the employer and the employee (and is mandated under Korean Law in most situations), a verbal agreement can also create a legally binding employment relationship between an employer and employee in

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Can you claim severance pay from a Non-Korean Employer?

Severance Pay is a payment which the employer is required to pay an “employee” for a retiring, terminated or resigning employees that works for a company in Korea for, at least, one year.  The reason for termination, retirement or resignation does not effect the applicability of the severance requirement.  Even an employee who is fired due to fault can claim severance pay under Korean law. Severance pay is a statutory liability of the employer.  It doesn’t matter whether an employment

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Non-Compete Clauses in Korean Employment Agreements and Korean Business Sales Agreements

Non-compete clauses in Korean employment contracts are enforceable in Korea, but there are some limitations and requirements that must be met for them to be regarded as lawful and, thus, enforceable. A Non-Compete Clause is a type of restrictive covenant that is designed to protect the business of an employer from competition from a particular party. These clauses are, typically, utilized after the completion of the sale of a business or after termination of employment. The following article shall, specifically,

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Dismissal of Employees in Korea: Supreme Court of Korea Precedent

The Korean Supreme Court ruled, in March of 2018, that a company may terminate employees for one incident of employee gambling. The case is a precedent that may make it easier for employees to terminate employees that violate certain company rules without the need to provide notification and an opportunity to improve. The case stems from the termination of bus drivers that were caught on one occasion gambling prior to driving buses. The lower courts ruled, in short, that gambling

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Korean Labor Law Checklist for Employers and Employees

The Korean Ministry of Labor created this list with revisions by Sean Hayes and IPG. I will update the list periodically. The checklist is intended for all employers that employ five or more workers. The list contains many generalizations, thus, don’t take this as the end-all list. I suggest, also, clicking on the label to the right entitled Korean Employment Law. Please note that Korea’s Labor Law is evolving rapidly, thus, this list may not reflect recent changes.   KOREAN LABOR

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Last week’s Recap of the Top Legal Headlines in South Korea for the week of August 9, 2021:

Samsung leader Jay Y Lee wins parole from prison South Korean school teacher sentenced in Bitcoin assault case Korean politicans to amend sex crime laws criminalising semen terrorism Press freedom to nose dive after Korean parliament introduces fake news bill Former government official wins discrimination case against Korean government You may schedule a free initial consultation with a lawyer at: Please Schedule a Call with an Attorney. Latest Posts: The Signs of a Great Criminal Lawyer in Korea | English-Speaking

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Minimum Wage Raised in Korea for 2020: Employment Law Updates

South Korea has chosen to raise the minimum wage by 2.9% for 2020 to KRW 8,590 (c. USD 7.11).  The Minimum Wage Commission of Korea set the wage at a lower than expected increase because of deteriorating economic conditions in Korea. President Moon’s plan to raise the minimum wage to KRW 10,000 per hour shall fall short, because of, among other things, a slower than expected growth rate and regional geopolitical issues facing Korea.  We shall keep the reader updated

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