Employment Support for Disabled Soldiers in the Line of Duty as per the Amended Korean Act on the Management of Civilian Personnel in the Military Service 2019

The bill on the Amendment to the Korean Act on the Management of Civilian Personnel in the Military Service (hereinafter as “Amendment to the Act on Civilian Personnel in the Military Service” or “Act”) was passed by the Korean National Assembly on March 28, 2019. The Act is intended to improve the financial and work-related recovery of Korean military soldiers, which are disabled by an injury during military service. History

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Suspending Korean Workers without Pay due to Economic Fallout from the Coronavirus: Korean Employment Law Basics

IPG has numerous client-employers in Korea that are facing serious economic conditions because of the spread of the coronavirus across Korea. In my nearly two decades, in Korea, we have never seen such a dire situation. This situation seems, on its face, even more dire for those in F & B and certain manufacturing sectors than the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis (IMF Crisis). Yes, I was even in Korea during

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Terminate/Layoff an Employee in Korea: Terminating an Employee in Korea

The Korean Labor Standards Act mandates that employees under “contract” or “regular employees” may only be terminated for “justifiable reason attributable” to the employee or “urgent managerial necessity” after the completion of the employee’s probationary period. Both Korean employment law standards are, often, difficult for an employer to meet without the professional structuring of HR policies and procedures and a nuanced approach to termination of employees in Korea. We strongly

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English-Speaking Korean Labor & Employment Lawyers in Korea

This Korean Law Blog is brought to you by English-speaking Korean labor lawyers & employment lawyers working for IPG Legal – an international law firm with offices in Korea.  Sean is the author of this blog and English-speaking Korean lawyers contribute to the blog.  Please find below a few of the most recent matters we have worked on. Leading rating services have rated IPG attorneys as leading lawyers working in

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Korean Independent Contractor Risks: Korean Labor Standards Act Basics

The Korean Court System has been less reluctant, in recent years, to deem a Korean independent contractor an “employee” under the Labor Standards Act (LSA).  This fact remains true even when an employer establishes that the independent contractor is aware that he/she was contracted as an independent contractor, thus, not a regular employee of the Korean company. Upon the establishment of the status as “employee” in Korea, the individual is

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Hiring English-Speaking Korean Labor Lawyers in Korea

In most cases involving employment issues concerning foreign language teachers and hagwons (not company executives), Korean labor lawyers may not be a cost-effective means of handling your dispute. Often a Nomusa (노무사) is an adequate means to resolve the dispute with your employer. A Nomusa is, however, often not adequate for high-net worth individuals, company executives and for complex cases.  These type matters, often, should be filed to a court

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Increased Scrutiny of Employers by Korean’s Ministry of Employment & Labor under President Moon’s Administration: HR Audit Needed by Korean Employment Lawyers

Many Korean Employment Lawyers are taking note of the recent initiative by Korea’s Ministry of Employment & Labor.  At the end of June of 2017, the Ministry announced an “Unfair Labor Practice Eradication Initiative.” This Initiative intends to investigate and punish perceived “unfair labor practices” of employers in Korea by having the Ministry of Employment & Labor conduct more audits of companies and provide punishment for those perceived to be

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Termination after Childcare Leave in Korea: Childcare Leave Law in Korea

Korea’s generous Childcare Leave Law poses difficulties to many smaller employers in Korea.  The Childcare Leave Law, in Korea, allows for a one year period of leave per child under the age of seven. Employers, often, are required to hire a replacement employee when the employee departs for this childcare leave.  This situation, often, leads to an employee returning to employment with little to no work to do. So can

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Can you Revise Employment Rules in Korea without the Agreement of Employees?

The Guidebook on Wage System Reform, published by the Korean Ministry of Employment & Labor, has sparked more interest, in the private sector, than the revamping of Korea’s wage system based on seniority. The major issue, in this regard, is if the Rules of Employment of a company may be amended, without violating the Labor Standards Act of Korea (“LSA”), when “wage system reform” is not consented to by a

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