Korean Wills: Korean Estate Law Basics

Like in most jurisdictions, the recognition of a will by a court of law requires precise formalities.  We advise that most people have a will.  For individuals with wills that shall be governed by Korean Law the formalities are noted below.  We have omitted two forms of wills – a will by audio recording and dictation. These types of wills pose issues of authentication of the decadent and we believe it is not advisable – in most cases. Korean Holographic Wills A Holographic will is a handwritten will.  For a holographic will to be enforceable in Korea the will should meet the following formalities: Written by the decadent Dated Signed Note the decadents name and address Sealed or contain a thumbprint. Additional details on holographic will may be found at: Korean Holographic Wills  Korean Notarized Wills Will is executed before a Korean notary Two witnesses should be present at the notary

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Korean Inheritance Law: Who Inherits What, When & How in Korea?

If a decadent, governed by Korea’s Inheritance Law, dies without a will (intestate succession) the estate of decadent shall pass according to Korea’s Intestate Succession Law.  The key points of Korean Intestate Succession Law and Korean Inheritance Law is noted below.  We deal with many cases, at our law firm in Korea, where a Korean family member requests a U.S. or European family member to disclaim an inheritance.  Normally, a form is provided to the foreign family member.  We suggest understanding the situation and understanding what you are disclaiming.  For an article on this issue please see: Disclaiming an Inheritance & Renouncing an Estate in Korea.  Korean Intestate Succession Law Priorities under Korea’s Intestate Succession Law:  Direct descendants (children and grandchildren); Direct ascendants (parents and grandparents); Siblings (brothers and sisters); and Relatives within the 4th Degree. If a spouse survives the decadent and descendants survive within the First or Second

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