Sean Hayes Presentation to Korea Business Forum: The Korean Labour Law v. the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Sean Hayes commented on legal issues related to Korean Labour Law and Korean startups for the Korea Business Forum on October 18, 2018 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Seoul, Korea.  The Korean Business Forum is a group of professionals that share insight and their experience on issues related to doing business in Korea. The group is one of the most renowned business groups in Korea. “KBF meets twelve times a year and provides an opportunity for  senior executives to discuss among themselves and with experts specific issues likely to impact their operations and strategies in Korea and North East Asia. The form portrays a local and regional peerspective on today’s business environment in Korea and by combinijng the knowledge of EABC, KABC, outside speakers and AXP analysis’ ideas are presentaed to challenge participants. A stimulating and dynamic environment is provided with authoritative presentations which allow executivees to look beyond

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Korean Business Culture vs. Western Business Culture Explained by IPG Attorneys

We, often, have clients that proclaim that they can’t understand the way that Koreans do things.  They complain about an inability to reason, keep promises, express opinions and give a straight answer. Koreans have plenty of complaints about Westerners also.  Koreans, often, complain that Westerners concentrate too much on details and not enough on the big picture, care about money more than friendship and focus too much on efficiency. The root of these issues is vastly different cultural realities. Korean Business the Gangnam-Style Way The Lewis Cultural Model does an excellent job of explaining these differences.  The Lewis Cultural Model breaks cultures into three distinct categories: Linear-Active; Multi-Active; and Reactive. Linear-Active Cultures Linear-Active cultures base decisions and actions on logic.  Individuals in these cultures tend to be efficient, schedule oriented, and base decisions on a plan and reason.  These individuals are often criticized for focusing too much on the task at

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Is the Korean Market Open to Foreign Businesses by Tom Coyner

For many years, the Korean market has been synonymous with protectionism in many foreign marketers’ minds.  However, with the advent of a strong middle class and its successful struggle to gain a genuine democracy during the past two decades, many of the trade barriers have fallen. As more foreign products and services have become integrated into the Korean economy, a wider acceptance of foreign corporations has taken place. However, it would be a mistake to say this is a trend.  A number of counter factors remain — some of which are even strengthening.  Foreign companies, especially from the major countries, are regarded with mixed feelings. While high technology and advanced products are admired and coveted, they are at the same time somewhat feared by Korean businessmen who perceive the possibility of having to depend on them.  When using foreign IT products and services, Koreans sometimes feel they themselves are not

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